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Jun 25 15

Epic Origami

by vrecinto

ANIMAlSImiloa Astronomy Center will feature local Waimea artist Bonnie Cherni and other guest artists in a new EPIC ORIGAMI exhibit. The three-month exhibit will explore the art and science of origami from July 5, 2015 – September 27, 2015. Cherni’s art has been shown at Kahilu Theatre,

Photo of Bonnie Cherni

Photo of Bonnie Cherni

Keck Observatory, and Waimea Ocean Film Festival and will be presented at ‘Imiloa with some never-seen-before pieces including the Jackson lizard, an endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, rhinos, the wild pig and a smiley frog. This exhibit will also explore how the application of math to art has made advances in astronomy, medicine and the automotive industry. In conjunction with this exhibit, the award-winning film “Between the Folds” will be shown daily in the planetarium at 11:00 a.m. (not full dome, but letterbox format). This documentary paints a striking portrait of the remarkable artistic and scientific creativity that fuels the ever-changing art of origami, fusing science and sculpture, form and function, and ancient and new. A hands-on origami folding station and exciting origami scavenger hunt will also be a part of this exhibit.

The exhibit will officially open on Sunday, July 5 at 9:00 a.m. with two showings of “Between the Folds” at 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. and origami folding stations available throughout the day. From 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. ‘Imiloa members are invited to a private pizza lunch and exclusive origami folding activities with artist Bonnie Cherni.Lizard

Cherni is an avid student of John Montroll’s designs and was inspired to fold origami from the age of fifteen. She is the leading artist for this exhibit and has collaborated with guest artists from around the world, creating everything from miniature to life-sized sculptures, in mediums ranging from paper, Fireworksaluminum, copper and canvas. Her art embodies the idea of “folding sturdy sculptures that can live out in the real world.” Other artists represented include: (1) Vietnamese artist Nguyen Hung Cuong lives in Hanoi and folds many of his expressive designs using a Vietnamese paper with a waxy finish called Dó. He has been folding since the young age of five and has been featured in many origami books with his incredibly detailed pieces. (2) Terry Nicolas is a professional origami artist who resides in Paris, France. He is an accomplished author and creator of one of the most popular origami sites in the world (origami-shop.us). (3) Steven Epstein resides on the Big Island.  With a degree in computer science and minor in math, Epstein has fun bringing math to life with his intricate modular origami pieces. (4) Local artist Shannon Nakaya is a highly recognized bird surgeon and veterinarian who applies her understanding of anatomical structure and function to folding complex origami.

Admission to EPIC ORIGAMI and “Between the Folds” is included in the general admission fee of $17.50 for adults and $9.50 for children. Kama’aina prices are available and, as always, ‘Imiloa Giraffemembers receive free admission.

ORIGAMI WORKSHOPS

Cherni will be back at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center to teach special workshops on July 11 and September 19 from 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.  Beginner to advanced origami folders are welcome and can explore the many possibilities of this fun and addicting art! Admission is $25.00 for members and $35.00 for non-members. Space is very limited so early registration is suggested.  An adult must accompany children under ten.  To sign-up, visit ‘Imiloa’s front desk or call (808) 969-9703.

tribune ad origami redo

May 29 15

Antarctica Astronomy

by vrecinto
 Amundsen-Scott Station

The South Pole Telescope at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

 

Next Maunakea Skies Talk June 19, 2015

Speaker: Professor Walter Gear, East Asian Observatory

Topic: Astronomy in Antarctica

Antarctica is the coldest, driest, windiest continent on earth. While inhospitable for humans and most animals, it is an excellent site for astronomy, indeed the best in the world for some types of observations.

Professor Gear will review the geography and properties of Antarctica before describing his own experiences in reaching and spending time at the South Pole, and explaining some of the world-leading astronomical results that have been obtained there.

Dr. Walter Gear is a professor at Cardiff University, Wales, UK and is currently spending time at the Eastwalter gear Asian Observatory in Hilo, which has taken over operations of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) from the UK. Professor Gear has been coming to the Island of Hawai’i for over 30 years to make use of the outstanding skies on Maunakea, including living in Hilo for two years in the 1990s when he led commissioning and operation of the SCUBA camera on the JCMT. Gear’s research is largely concerned with astronomical instrumentation, the Cosmic Microwave Background and Star-formation in Galaxies.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by an ‘Imiloa planetarium staff who will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

AURORAMAPO

May 12 15

Hilo Lahaina Noon 2015

by vrecinto

lahaina noon 072

It is that time of year when the Hawaiian Islands experience the astronomical phenomenon known as “Lahaina Noon.” That is  when the sun reaches its zenith and makes shadows virtually disappear for vertical objects set at a 90 degree angle. Hawai‘i is the only state in the nation with this phenomenon, because it only happens in the tropics (between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn). It occurs twice a year at every location in the islands.

During  Lahaina Noon at ‘Imiloa in Hilo, our 14 foot mosaic “Voyage of the Navigator” will be illuminated when the sun will be directly over the sky light, thus creating a great example of Lahaina Noon.  Let’s just hope we have a sunny Hilo day. Unfortunately we are closed Mondays.

2015 Lahaina Noon days and times

Hilo

May 18 12:17 p.m.

July 24 12:26 p.m.

Kailua-Kona

May 18 12:20 p.m.

July 24 12:30 p.m.

Līhue 

May 31 12:35 p.m.

July 11 12:42 p.m.

Kāne‘ohe

May 27 12:28 p.m.

July 15 12:37 p.m.

Honolulu

May 26 12:28 p.m.

July 16 12:37 p.m.

Kaunakakai

May 25 12:25 p.m.

July 16 12:34 p.m.

Lāna‘i City

May 24 12:24 p.m.

July 18 12:34 p.m.

Lahaina

May 24 12:23 p.m.

July 18 12:33 p.m.

Kahului

May 24 12:22 p.m.

July 18 12:32 p.m.

Hāna

May 23 12:20 p.m.

July 18 12:30 p.m.

South Point Island of Hawai‘i

May 15 12:19 p.m.

July 28 12:28 p.m.

 

 

May 9 15

Recent Discoveries and Future Promise from UKIRT

by vrecinto

ukirt_fisheye

Next Maunakea Skies Talk May 15, 2015 at 7PM

Speaker: Dr. Richard Green, UKIRT

Topic: UKIRT: Recent Discoveries and Future Promise + The International Year of Light

The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) was conceived and realized by astronomers in the UK to be particularly sensitive to infrared radiation. After major refurbishment in the 1990s and the addition of a unique panoramic camera ten years ago, the facility has surveyed the infrared sky to power an outpouring of ukirt-jan31-webscientific discovery. Studies of the distant Universe where all objects are highly redshifted benefit from UKIRT’s ability to detect and measure faint, red objects. Similarly, in the nearby Universe, newly formed stars are shrouded in reddening dust and very small stars shine dimly red. Both are visible to UKIRT.

Dr. Green will discuss the latest results on the most distant quasars, how galaxies evolve over cosmic time, and the ways that clouds of cold gas fragment and condense into clusters of newly formed stars. Since last November, UKIRT has been under new management. Not only will it continue to observe the most distant galaxies and quasars along with nearby stellar nurseries, it will also be used to characterize objects right next door, such as orbital space debris and asteroids coming very near the Earth.

The United Nations declared 2015 as the International Year of Light. Astronomers are actively participating to emphasize two aspects of light: Cosmic Light, which provides our key to the Universe beyond our planet, and Quality Light, the control of our nighttime lighting to save energy, preserve the biosphere, and protect the observatories that provide our gateway to the heavens from blinding glare.

Dr. Richard Green is the Assistant Director for Government Relations of Steward Observatory at the DrUniversity of Arizona. He graduated from Harvard College in 1971 and then went to graduate school in astronomy at CalTech. In 1983 he became a staff astronomer at Kitt Peak, and in 1992 he moved into management of the National Observatories. He was Director of Kitt Peak National Observatory from 1997 to 2005, and then was appointed the Director of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory at the University of Arizona until 2013. Dr. Green  is now serving as Director of UKIRT Observatory here on the Island of Hawai’i. Green’s major research interests are in quasars and the early Universe, the cosmic history of chemical element abundances, dynamics of the nuclei of galaxies, and the end stages of stellar evolution.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Apr 14 15

Reflections on the First 20 Years of Hōkūleʻa

by vrecinto

IMG_3403 (1)

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents the wayfinding talk Voices from the Wa‘a: Reflections on the First 20 Years of the Hōkūle‘a on Friday, April 24, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. This program will feature Gordon Pi‘ianāi‘a, the captain of Hōkūle‘a on its pivotal 1980 voyage, during which he and Nainoa Thompson and others became the first Hawaiians in some 600 years to locate Tahiti without using modern navigational tools.

Enjoy this night of storytelling from a veteran Hōkūle‘a crew member, as Pi‘ianāi‘a recounts the first twenty years of the Polynesian voyaging renaissance.

Pi‘ianāi‘a spent 20 years sailing and voyaging on the Hōkūle‘a, serving as first mate on her 1976 voyage from Tahiti to Hawai‘i and also as Captain on the 1980 and 1985 voyages. Pi‘ianāi‘a was one of the early pioneering leaders in the formative years of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, serving both as co-chair of the Education Committee and also as a board member. Today he continues to work to perpetuate and revitalize the art of wayfinding and navigation through his involvement with the ‘Ohana Wa‘a, a consortium of Hawai‘i’s voyaging organizations, canoe leadership and crews.

Captain Gordon Keawe-a-Heulu Keli‘imaika‘i Pi‘ianāi‘a is a retired U.S. Naval Reserve Officer, educator and community leader. He was born in Honolulu to a family noted for its mariners and geographers. His father Abraham was a master mariner who introduced him to the sea when he was five by taking him sailing on inter-island ships. His brother Norman, a graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, retired from a career as a senior ship’s master at Matson Navigation.

The Pi‘ianāi‘a family have all participated in Hōkūle‘a’s voyages. A graduate of the Kamehameha School for Boys, Gordon received his Bachelors of Science in Nautical Science from the California Maritime Academy, and later conducted graduate studies in Geography at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, joining his father Abraham and sister ‘Ilima in the Department of Geography.

‘Imiloa’s wayfinding programs are made possible through generous title sponsorship from Matson.

The program ticketing is $10 for non-members and $8 for members (member level discounts apply.) Tickets may be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone, using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or JCB, by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9700.

 

Matson Anchor T  - Blue (2)

Apr 10 15

Moon RIDERS Project

by vrecinto

Iolani Moon Rider rs

Join Rob Kelso, Executive Director at the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) as he introduces the Moon RIDERS Hawai‘i robotics teams’ work on the electrodynamic dust shield (EDS) lunar project and the partnership with PISCES, NASA, and Google Lunar Xprize.  ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center’s next Maunakea Skies program entitled “Moon RIDERS: 2016 Hawai‘i High Schools’ Experiment on the Surface of the Moon,” is Friday, April 17, 2015 at 7 p.m.

Over the past 2-years PISCES and the NASA-Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have been working together in partnership for a lunar surface flight experiment leveraging transportation through the Google Lunar X-Prize (GLXP). This joint flight test project for a lunar surface flight experiment is called: Moon RIDERS (Research Investigating Dust Expulsion Removal Systems.)

Recently, the two Hawai‘i high schools selected for participation in this joint project were publically announced as Kealakehe High School in Kona and ‘Iolani School from Honolulu.

“While the Google Lunar X-PRIZE is designed to inspire pioneers to do robotic space transport on a budget,  the Moon RIDERS project seeks to inspire this generation of Hawai‘i high school students in a first-ever student–participation involving a lunar surface experiment project with emphasis on STEM.” Notes Kelso.

In a similar fashion, this project allows for critical flight testing and validation of spacecraft systems technology on the surface of the moon, something NASA is unable to do on its own, up to this point.

NASA-KSC has been actively working to advance dust-removal technologies which could be critical in future spacecraft systems operating on planetary surfaces, referred to as the Electrodynamic Dust Shield. PISCES, given its legislative direction in advancing planetary surface systems, saw this collaboration as an opportunity to uniquely involve Hawai‘i high school students in a joint engineering project with NASA-KSC, flying as a hosted-payload on an upcoming GLXP mission to the Moon’s surface in late 2016.

Rob Kelso has served as the Executive Director at PISCES since November of 2012. Kelso is a career civil servant, serving 37 years at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, formerly holding a position as the NASA Shuttle Flight Director at NASA’s famed Mission Control Center. He also served as NASA’s Mission Director, responsible for the launch and delivery of the Chandra X-Ray telescope, the last of the great NASA observatories sent into space by NASA.

Kelso has been the recipient of the NASA Outstanding Leaderships Medal, and NASA Exceptional Service Medal.  He holds a Bachelors Degree in physics and a Masters in Business Administration.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff.  He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

The Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems is a Hawai‘i State Government Aerospace Agency located in Hilo. The Center is part of the State Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism (DBEDT) and conducts environmentally safe field demonstrations on Hawai‘i’s volcanic terrain to test and validate advanced space technologies under the jurisdiction of the State Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR).

PISCES’ projects also include robotics, advanced manufacturing, and advanced communications, all of which involve dual-use technologies: they have applications both in space and here at home. They can potentially advance planetary surface systems technology, as well as stimulate the growth of Hawai‘i’s economy, create jobs locally, educate keiki astronauts-to-be, and improve our State’s sustainability.

 

Mar 25 15

‘Imiloa Presents: Kona Harp Ensemble

by Anna Liu

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents the Kona Harp Ensemble on Sunday, April 12 at 11:00 a.m. Kona Harp Ensemble’s unique sound of three harps, various traditional flutes, a synth and percussion will take you on a musical journey around the world. Enjoy music by Vivaldi, Beethovan, Pachebel, O’Carollan, Jimmy Page, as well as Hawaiian music and original compositions beautifully set by the backdrop of ‘Imiloa’s night sky. Experience the beautiful music of this diverse and talented five-member ensemble as they converge on one stage for a rare afternoon concert.

Bernice RobertoBernice Roberto is a professional harpist, music teacher and private instructor. She began studying harp with Francis Duffy of the Pittsburgh symphony. Roberto is also a composer, songwriter and vocalist and performs regularly at The Four Seasons Resort, Hilton and Sheraton Hotels. She and husband Manuel share a love for music and have recorded several CDs.

Motter SnellMotter Snell is a professional harpist and has performed with the Seattle Symphony, Pacific Northwest Ballet Orchestra and Seattle Opera. She was the principal harpist with the Bellevue Philharmonic Orchestra for eight years and Tacoma Symphony Orchestra for ten years. She is a graduate of the University of Washington School of Music and has been president of the Musicians Association of Seattle since 2001.

IrminsulIrminsul is a Celtic Harpist, pianist and composer. He has traveled with all sorts of acts from heavy metal to neoCeltic and he has written for piano, strings, woodwinds, mixed ensembles and orchestras. He was the youngest church organist at age fourteen and has won several music composition awards.

Manuel RobertoManuel Roberto is a World Music flautist. He is a master of the wooden and bamboo bass flutes including the Bansuri, Shakuhachi and Native American flutes. He has studied with some of the greatest musicians in the world including GS Sachdev, Zakir Hussain and Pandit Jasraj and has composed music for theatre and television as well.

Jean Pierre ThomaJean Pierre Thoma is a world traveled musician and educator. He performs on flute, saxophone and clarinet. Besides completing a Bachelors and Masters degree in music, he has performed in Europe, Japan, India and Africa. Thoma currently teaches at the Pacific Academy of Music here in Hilo.

Tickets for this event are $15 for members and $20 for non-members and can be purchased by visiting ‘Imiloa’s front desk or by calling (808) 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org.

kona harp

Mar 14 15

Remembering 25 years of the Hubble Space Telescope

by vrecinto

M82

Next Maunakea Skies Talk March 20, 2015

Speaker: Dr. Richard Griffiths, UH Hilo Department of Physics and Astronomy

Topic: 25 Years of Science with the Hubble Space Telescope

Next month, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, which has captured the public imagination and brought astronomy into the forefront, influencing the next generation of scientists and engineers.

In the 1960s and 1970s NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) began design studies of a large telescope in space, which was carried into orbit by the Space Shuttle on April 24, 1990.

The first images from the Hubble were blurred by an aberration in the primary mirror, but new NASA instruments were launched in late 1993 to correct the problem and the Hubble has since met or exceeded all expectations. Over the years, there have been a total of five shuttle missions which have serviced the Hubble, and these have been used to upgrade the systems and the instruments on board, improving the capabilities of the telescope even further.

Dr. Griffiths’s talk will highlight some of the major achievements that have been made by astronomers using the Hubble, from objects in the local universe to the most distant infant galaxies yet observed. The Hubble has been used to perform seminal observations of all classes of astronomical objects, from studies in our own solar system to exploratory observations of extrasolar planets to the study of stellar populations in nearby galaxies and supernovae in the distant universe.

In the “deep surveys” performed using Hubble, the telescope is pointed at ‘blank’ areas of sky for about a month, revealing tens of thousands of galaxies. From these deep surveys, we have learned about the formation and evolution of galaxies in the universe, from infant objects to galaxies like the Milky Way.

Dr. Richard Griffiths is a physics graduate of Imperial College of Science and Technology (University ofWendover_Aug05 002_reg London) and the University of Leicester (Ph.D. 1972). He has worked in the USA since 1976, initially in the X-ray astrophysics group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, where he worked on X-ray satellite data and developed the first charge-coupled devices for X-ray imaging and spectroscopy.

His background is in the development of detectors and instrumentation for rocket and satellite experiments in astronomy, especially visible-light and x-ray imagers. In 1983 he took a position at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, working on the Wide Field and Planetary Cameras on the Hubble, and later moved to a faculty position at Johns Hopkins University. He took up a tenured physics professorship at Carnegie Mellon University in 1996 and became Emeritus Professor there on retirement from CMU in 2013. Griffiths currently works at the University of Hawai’i, Hilo where he is an Affiliate Full Professor in the Physics and Astronomy department. He teaches astrophysics and continues his research work using X-ray telescopes in space and the Hubble Space Telescope, together with the Keck and other ground-based optical observatories.

From 2008 to 2013, Griffiths worked as a visiting scientist at NASA Headquarters in Washington DC, on leave of absence from Carnegie Mellon University. At NASA, Griffiths was Program Scientist for a number of strategic space missions, including the Hubble Space Telescope and future missions aimed to study the properties of dark energy.

Griffiths has over 300 publications in refereed scientific journals and has given many invited talks at international meetings. He served on the Board of Directors of the Southern African Large Telescope from 1997 to 2010.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Mar 6 15

A Cream Tea Chat Focused on Nutrition

by vrecinto

joanne

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center observes National Nutrition Month with A Cream Tea & Chat on Sunday, March 15, 2015 from 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Experience a traditional cream tea with JoAnn Aguirre while learning about the health benefits of drinking tea.

A cream tea is a form of an afternoon light meal consisting of tea taken with a combination of scones, clotted cream and jams or curds. It is a simple and basic indulgence; a pick-me-up that may be enjoyed at any time of the day. While partaking in this English tradition, discover why the second most consumed drink is often recommended as part of a healthy diet. Thousands of published studies in leading medical journals support the potential health benefits of tea and the major bioactive compounds in tea called flavonoids are often linked with the beverage’s healthful properties.

Aguirre is a former educator with more than twenty years of experience in tea. Today, she finds joy in sharing her passion with others through events such as this, as well as through her Hilo shop called Teaching Tea.

Tickets for this event are $12 for members and $17 for non-members and can be purchased by visiting ‘Imiloa’s front desk or by calling (808) 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org.

Tea talk march2015OutFlyerrs

Feb 12 15

February MKS looks at Maunakea’s Future

by vrecinto

Imiloa Maunakea Skies - 2015

Next Maunakea Skies Talk February 20, 2015

Speaker: Dr. Doug Simons, Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT)

Topic: Perspectives on the Future of Maunakea

With the contention surrounding last year’s TMT ground breaking ceremony, future observatory construction and deconstruction plans, and a new master lease under consideration for the summit of Maunakea, this unique and sacred site is at an incredible intersection of visions, beliefs, and frontiers. Dr. Simons’ presentation explores many of the facets of Maunakea, where earth meets sky in the Hawaiian archipelago, ranging from its cultural and religious importance to the phenomenal discoveries made through observations from the Maunakea observatories.

“Can a lasting and widely accepted vision for the future of Maunakea emerge from these disparate views?” This is a difficult question, and as Dr. Simons notes, “the answer isn’t etched in the sky or an echo from the past, but is ultimately found within ourselves.”

Dr. Doug Simons received his B.S. in astronomy at the California Institute of Technology in 1985 and aSimons_CFHT Ph.D. in astronomy at the University of Hawai‘i in 1990 before working as a staff astronomer at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope for 4 years. Doug joined Gemini Observatory in May of 1994 as the Systems Scientist, then managed Gemini’s instrument development program for 5 years before becoming Gemini’s Director from 2006-2011. Doug returned to CFHT in 2012 where he now serves as Executive Director. Principal areas of interest include infrared instrumentation and studies of the Galactic center, low mass stars, and star formation regions.

CFHT will provide their 2015 Hawaiian Starlight Wall Calendar for the first 50 in the planetarium line that night. The twelve gorgeous, true-color images obtained by the MegaCam wide-field CCD imaging camera illustrate brilliantly the rich and complex structures populating our Universe.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.