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Dec 19 14

FROZEN Sing-A-Long at ‘Imiloa

by vrecinto

 frozen characters

‘Imiloa presents: FROZEN Sing-A-Long

Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 10:00 am and 1:30 pm.

Love the songs of Disney’s Frozen? 

Join us as we sing along with Elsa, Anna, Olaf and friends.

All ages are welcome  and dress up as your favorite Disney character or Super Hero!

“For the first time in forever,” sing along to the words of the Academy Award-Nominated film event of a generation. Enjoy Disney’s Frozen Sing-A-Long, at a special sing along screening in ‘Imiloa’s Monanahoku Hall on Sunday, January 11, 2015.  There will be two showings available, 10 am and 1:30 pm, as well as Fun Frozen Science activities in the exhibit hall from 10 am to 4 pm for all participants.

Chances are you know the lyrics to “Let it Go” by heart. Join the whole FROZEN gang as you belt out “Do You Wanna Build a Snowman” and “For the First Time in Forever.”

After the kingdom of Arendelle is cast into eternal winter by the powerful Snow Queen Elsa (voice of Idina Menzel), her sprightly sister Anna (Kristen Bell) teams up with a rough-hewn mountaineer named Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) and his trusty reindeer Sven to break the icy spell. Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee co-directed this Walt Disney Animation Studios production based on Hans Christian Andersen’s beloved fairy tale The Snow Queen published circa 1845.

 Cost is $4 for Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703. Ticket includes one screening and entry to the Frozen Science Activities in the Exhibit Hall. Seating is limited.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Practice the “Let it Go” lyrics!

Dec 6 14

What is PANOPTES?

by vrecinto

panotopes

Next Maunakea Skies Talk December 19, 2014

Speakers: Dr. Olivier Guyon and Dr. Josh Walawender, Subaru Telescope-NAOJ

Topic: Observing Exoplanets with Small and Large Telescopes

Time: Friday, December 19, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Over the last 20 years, astronomers have discovered thousands of exoplanets. Thanks to recent technological advances, the pace of discovery is accelerating, and Earth-sized planets are now detectable around other stars. The prospects for life outside the solar system look excellent, with 10% to 40% of stars hosting potentially habitable Earth-sized planets with a surface temperature able to sustain liquid water. The search for exoplanets is done with a wide range of techniques, each making rapid progress. Very small telescopes can be used to find new planets by monitoring a large number of stars to search for planet transits.

Dr. Guyon and Dr. Walawender will present the Panoptic Astronomical Networked OPtical observatory for Transiting Exoplanets Survey project (PANOPTES), which is establishing a network of robotic wide field imaging units built and operated by citizen scientists. Each unit uses inexpensive digital cameras to find large planets. The full network can find smaller planets by combining many measurements. Once found, exoplanets can be observed with large professional telescopes for detailed study. Astronomers are developing cameras optimized for directly imaging exoplanets with large telescopes, which requires unconventional optics to remove the bright glare of the star around which a planet orbits. Thanks to these instruments, scientists will soon measure the composition of potentially habitable exoplanets’ atmospheres and surfaces, and search for evidence of biological activity.

Dr. Olivier Guyon is an astronomer at the Subaru Telescope-NAOJ. He started looking at stars from theguyon 14 age of 10, and he is now both an avid amateur astronomer and a professional astronomer. Olivier has been developing new techniques for imaging exoplanets (planets around other stars) from telescopes on Earth and also future telescopes in space. In 2007, Olivier received a Presidential Early Career for Scientists and Engineers award from President Bush at the White House. Olivier received in 2012, the MacArthur fellowship (nicknamed the “Genius grant”) for his innovative work in astronomical optics. In his spare time, he builds telescopes which he then uses to observe from the clear skies of Maunakea and Maunaloa.

walawenderDr. Josh Walawender is an astronomer at the Subaru Telescope-NAOJ on Maunakea. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of California at Berkeley and his PhD at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Josh’s research interests lie in the area of star formation and he has worked extensively on building and operating “small” (0.1 to 1 meter) robotic telescopes. Josh has been an avid amateur astronomer since childhood and still enjoys observing sessions under Hawai’i Island’s pristine skies.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Nov 21 14

Revisiting Bethlehem and the Christmas Star

by vrecinto

christmas_still1

‘Imiloa presents: The Skies Above Bethlehem & Mystery of the Christmas Star

Friday, December 12, 2014 at 7:00pm

We all know the Christian tale of the three wise men that followed the star of Bethlehem to the manger of the baby Jesus bearing gifts for the son of God. Although they followed the Christmas star, their skies would have been like today, filled with stars and other celestial objects.

Join the ‘Imiloa planetarium staff on a journey to the far side of the world as we turn back the clock two thousand years to look at the sky over Bethlehem. Once beneath the biblical sky, we will explore the heavens that were visible to the residents of Bethlehem the night Jesus was born. Skies Above Bethlehem is a seasonal remix of our classic Skies Above Hawai’i night sky program. Of course, this begs the question: how do we know what date to turn our clocks back to?christmas_postercrop

After the live presentation enjoy the planetarium show Mystery of the Christmas Star and discover a possible scientific explanation and time frame for the star the wise men followed to find the baby Jesus. This program investigates recorded sightings of significant astronomical events during the time of the birth of Christ. Investigators will see which of these signs in the sky could have been remarkable enough to cause the wise men to travel across the desert from Babylon just to see a newborn King.

Don’t miss this special holiday presentation, one night only, December 12th, 2014 at 7:00pm.

The program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff.  Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org. ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org.

Oct 30 14

Hello Universe

by vrecinto

TMT pic

Next Maunakea Skies Talk November 21, 2014

Speaker: Dr. Gordon K. Squires, TMT Communications and Outreach Lead

 Topic: Hello Universe – What Else Do You Have?

Time: Friday November 21, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Recent discoveries with current-generation observatories on Maunakea and in space will be highlighted with a sneak-peak of how the next-generation Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will advance our understanding of the universe even further. TMT has entered the construction phase in Hawai’i and across the TMT international partnership, with science operations scheduled to begin in the early 2020s. In this talk Dr. Squires will provide an update on the current status of TMT, discuss recent advances in Hawai’i and around the world in the construction of TMT, highlight the special nature of the unique partnership between the US, Canada, India, Japan and China, and the special location of Maunakea as a nexus for exploring our universe.

Gordon K. Squires is an astronomer at the California Institute of Technology, working with the Thirty Meter Telescope, as wellGordon Squires as NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, NuSTAR, Kepler, WISE, and other space telescopes with Caltech involvement. His research explores the old, cold and distant universe – understanding how galaxies formed billions of years ago, the nature of the dark matter, and dark energy that fills space.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.
The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Oct 29 14

‘Imiloa Welcomes Esben Borsting

by vrecinto

esben-1

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i Names Esben Borsting Deputy Director

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center announces the appointment of Esben Borsting as ‘Imiloa’s Deputy Director. ‘Imiloa is an informal science center honoring Maunakea by sharing Hawaiian culture and science to inspire exploration.

“I am excited to announce this new appointment,” said Ka‘iu Kimura, Executive Director of ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, “Esben will oversee all HR and Fiscal operations and will serve as part of ‘Imiloaʻs executive management team.”

Mr. Borsting was raised in Hilo, and is a graduate of Waiakea High School. Prior to coming to ʻImiloa, Borsting served for over seven years within University of Hawaiʻi management at both Kapiʻolani and Windward Community Colleges. He has served on various University of Hawai‘i leadership teams and recently implemented three campus-wide federal projects for the Kapiʻolani campus. Prior to Kapiʻolani, he worked at Kamehameha Schools in its extension education program where he directed a department of 16 to implement education programs across the state and to provide counseling services for scholarship recipients across the nation. At Kamehameha Schools, he also coordinated various agreements with community non-profits and state entities to implement community-based programs funded in part by the Kamehameha Schools.

“It is a great privilege and opportunity for me to bring my collection of experiences and skills to work for ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center and to support its educational mission,” said Borsting. He has 12 years of experience in management in higher education, community-based programs and government, and received a Master of Public Administration degree in 2005.

Oct 21 14

‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding Talk: Seeking Samoa

by vrecinto

cesi samoa pic

‘Imiloa Presents Voices From The Wa’a

Seeking Samoa: A Taupou’s Voyage Home
‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding Talk

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents the wayfinding talk Seeking Samoa: A Taupou’s Voyage Home on Friday, October 24, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. This program will feature apprentice navigator and Hilo native Celeste Manuia Haʻo, as she recounts the heartbreak and triumph of her epic return to Faleapuna, her village of Samoa, and the stars that led her there. ‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding programs are made possible through the generous title sponsorship from Matson.

When Celeste Haʻo was 17, her Grandfather bestowed the title of “taupou,” the highest title a woman can have in Samoa’s cesi pictraditional society, one who is responsible for looking after the well being of her village. Haʻo recently co-navigated Hōkūleʻa as an apprentice navigator from Aitutaki, Cook Islands to the island of Samoa where her family village of Faleapuna is located. For her, this voyage was of extreme significance as it was a fulfillment of her promise to her grandfather ten years in the making to navigate and return to their islands the way her ancestors once did…“by way of the sea and the stars.” He also required that she share the knowledge that she gained as an apprentice under Pwo navigator Kālepa Baybayan. His hope, as is hers, was that it would inspire his Samoan community to leave their shores once again the way their kupuna did and to bring navigation back to the place where it all began.

This presentation will feature ʻImiloa’s world-class planetarium, as Ha‘o will orient the audience to the night sky seen through her eyes as a Polynesian navigator.

Celeste “Cesi” Manuia Ha’o is an education associate and the outreach coordinator for ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i. Ha‘o, born in Keaukaha and raised in Pana‘ewa in Hilo, with her husband are busy raising three young children. As a current student of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, she will graduate next fall with her degree in Culture-Based Astronomy Education, a degree she created to enhance her life and occupational passion and mission of promoting place-based teaching and learning of astronomy and science through a cultural perspective.

‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding programs are made possible through the generous title sponsorship from Matson.

Matson Anchor T  - Blue (2)

The program ticketing is $10 for non-members and $8 for members (member level discounts apply.) Tickets may be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone, using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or JCB, by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9700.

Oct 16 14

Retracing Ancestral Connections

by vrecinto

navigation 14 128

The 2014 ‘Imiloa Wayfinding & Navigation Festival sponsored by Matson began with a simple story of ‘ohana waʻa, the countless connections created as a result of the 140,000 nautical miles Hōkūleʻa has traveled during 39 years of its lifetime. Celeste Manuia Ha’o, festival director, made reference to the importance of knowing ones own familial connections as she set the day’s theme, “Moananuiākea: Retracing Ancestral Connection” with her inspirational story titled, Seeking Samoa: A Taupou’s Voyage Home.

Celeste was bestowed with the highest title a woman can have in Samoa’s traditional society – a “taupou”- someone responsible for looking after the well being of her village, at the age of 17. A Hilo native and apprentice navigator, Celeste recounted the heartbreak and triumph of her epic return to Faleapuna, her village of Samoa.

From Kaimana Barcarse’s presentation on reconnecting the Hawaiian navigation traditions to the present day mission of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, celebrating through the rhythms and dance of the South Pacific ka moana nui ākea, the vast expansive ocean as the highway that connects us, researching and finding ancestors at the ‘Ohana Discovery Lab hosted by the Hawaii Family History Center, to the final presentation of the crew members aboard the voyage leg from Tahiti to the Cook Islands then to Samoa, each activity resonated this theme of connection.

Over one thousand visitors participated in day’s presentations and activities celebrating the “Spirit of the Sea.” Mahalo to Matson for their title sponsorship of the 2014 ʻImiloa Wayfinding & Navigation Festival.

Please submit any responses or comments by email to info@imiloahawaii.org

 

View our photo gallery:

Russell Chin, Matson District M‎anager for HI (second from left) presents check for title sponsorship of 'Imiloa's 2014 WNF and Wayfinding Talks to Ka'iu Kimura, ED, 'Imiloa (third from left). Looking on are Celeste Ha'o, 'Imiloa Education Associate and Coordinator of Wayfinding Festival (left), and Norman Piianaia, Retired Matson Captain (right

Russell Chin, Matson District Manager for HI (second from left) presents check for title sponsorship of ‘Imiloa’s 2014 Wayfinding & Navigation Festival and Wayfinding Talks to Ka’iu Kimura, ‘Imiloa Executive Director (third from left). Looking on are Celeste Ha‘o, ‘Imiloa Education Associate and Coordinator of Wayfinding Festival (left), and Norman Piianaia, Retired Matson Captain (right)

Mahalo to Matson for their title sponsorship of the 2014 ʻImiloa Wayfinding & Navigation Festival and the Wayfinding Talks.

 

Oct 14 14

Cancelled: Decoding the Red Planet

by vrecinto
ht_opportunity_rover_nt_130124_wmain

An artist’s rendition of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is superimposed on the rim of Victoria Crater on the Martian surface. Cornell /JPL/NASA

 

Due to Hurricane Ana, `Imiloa will close at 5pm tonight, Friday, October 17th, 2014.
Maunakea Skies is cancelled and Sky Garden Restaurant will not be open for dinner.
Sorry for any inconvenience.

 

Next Maunakea Skies Talk October 17, 2014

Speaker: Dr. Bo Reipurth, Institute for Astronomy (IfA)

Topic: Mars, the Red Planet, in Culture and Science

Time: Friday October 17, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Mars is the planet in our Solar System that is closest in appearance to our Earth. It has a thin atmosphere with clouds, polar ice caps, volcanoes, major dry riverbeds, valleys, and deserts. Its axis is tilted, so it has seasons like here on Earth. These similarities to Earth have caused much speculation about life on Mars, originally inspired by the (erroneous) discovery of canals on Mars, believed to be signs of an advanced civilization that was attempting to survive as their planet dried out. These ideas have inspired many novels, movies, and radio programs, the most famous was Orson Welles 1938 broadcast “The War of the Worlds,” which caused widespread panic.

Modern studies of Mars have been helped by a large number of satellites put into orbit around the planet, as well as several rovers, some of which are at the moment driving around on the Martian surface, providing amazingly detailed photos of the landscapes of Mars.

“All these studies indicate that Mars was warmer and wetter in a distant past, likely with shallow oceans covering part of the surface. This has led to renewed discussion of the possibility that microbial life could have formed in the past and survived in subsurface layers,” states Dr. Reipurth.

Now, present and future space missions are charged with finding out if life still exists on Mars. Future studies will be discussed, including plans for sending men to Mars within a few decades. This talk will summarize the changing views of Mars from antiquity to the present day, and will be illustrated with many of the stunning images brought back from the missions to Mars.

As a small child, one of Bo Reipurth’s first astronomical experiences was looking at the craters of the Moon and the rings of Saturn through the telescope at a public observatory in his native Copenhagen. After that experience, he never doubted that he would become an astronomer.Bo_MK

Reipurth received his PhD from the University of Copenhagen in 1981. After several years there as a postdoctoral researcher, he worked as a staff astronomer with the European Southern Observatory in Chile for 11 years. He then spent four years at the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy(CASA) of the University of Colorado as a research professor. He joined the IfA in Honolulu in 2001 and moved to the Hilo office in 2004.

Reipurth is the coauthor (with frequent collaborator John Bally) of “The Birth of Stars and Planets.” Published in 2006 by Cambridge University Press, it contains many beautiful color pictures of sites of star birth and text that is very accessible to nonscientists. He is also a member of the UH NASA Astrobiology Institute Lead Team, a cross-disciplinary group that is studying the relationship of water in the Universe to the development of life.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.
The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Sep 20 14

A Touch of Tahiti at ‘Imiloa!

by vrecinto

image (2)

A Touch of Tahiti
Demonstrations and Performance at ‘Imiloa!

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents Tahitian Week Tuesday, September 23 – Friday, September 26, 2014. Learn about the art of Tahitian drum making, dance, music and costume making through free demonstrations in the ‘Imiloa atrium from 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. (see schedule). Enjoy the Tahitian troupe’s show under the stars in the Planetarium on Friday evening, September 26 at 7:00 p.m. Tickets for this event are $12 for general admission and $8 for members.

‘Imiloa presents this special week in collaboration with Michael Spaulding, president of Poe O Hawai‘i and Corey Sibayan, raatira pupu (kumu) of Te Mau Aito O Hiro. Poe O Hawai‘i provides education and economic development opportunities for Hawai‘i’s people through art and culture.

Schedule:
9/23, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm: Tahitian Drums – Various stages of how they are carved and played (FREE)
9/24, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm: Tahitian Music – The rhythms and sounds of Tahitian music with instruments such as the tairi pahu, banjo (Tahitian ukulele), guitar and Hawaiian ukulele (FREE)
9/25, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm: Tahitian Dance – Basic fundamentals of a dance made to entice (FREE)
9/26, 10:30 am – 12:30 pm: Tahitian Costumes – How they are made and the materials used to make them (FREE)
7:00 pm: Live Performance in Planetarium (tickets $12 general admission, $8 for members).Seats are limited and can be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org. ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org.

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Sep 10 14

Black Holes: Monsters of the Universe

by Vin R

cena_comp

Next Maunakea Skies Talk September 19, 2014

Speaker: Dr. Geoffrey Bower, Academica Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA)

Topic: Black Holes: Monsters of the Universe

Time: Friday September 19 2014 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Massive black holes are thought to be located at the centers of all galaxies. With masses up to a billion times that of the Sun, these compact objects are efficient and powerful sources of energy, governing the formation of stars and the growth of galaxy clusters throughout the history of the Universe. At the same time, black holes provide a unique laboratory for exploring extreme gravity and testing the theory of General Relativity. Dr. Bower will provide a tour from the most distant and most powerful black holes to the starved black hole haunting the Milky Way.

Dr. Geoffrey Bower is Chief Scientist for Hawaii Operations for the Academica Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA). Dr. Bower studies black holes and IMG_0659other energetic phenomena using radio telescopes, including the Submillimeter Array on Maunakea, the Very Large Array in New Mexico, and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array in Chile. A graduate of Princeton University and UC Berkeley, Dr. Bower has previously performed his research and taught at the Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie in Germany, the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in New Mexico, and UC Berkeley.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.
‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.