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Feb 12 15

February MKS looks at Maunakea’s Future

by vrecinto

Imiloa Maunakea Skies - 2015

Next Maunakea Skies Talk February 20, 2015

Speaker: Dr. Doug Simons, Canada France Hawaii Telescope (CFHT)

Topic: Perspectives on the Future of Maunakea

With the contention surrounding last year’s TMT ground breaking ceremony, future observatory construction and deconstruction plans, and a new master lease under consideration for the summit of Maunakea, this unique and sacred site is at an incredible intersection of visions, beliefs, and frontiers. Dr. Simons’ presentation explores many of the facets of Maunakea, where earth meets sky in the Hawaiian archipelago, ranging from its cultural and religious importance to the phenomenal discoveries made through observations from the Maunakea observatories.

“Can a lasting and widely accepted vision for the future of Maunakea emerge from these disparate views?” This is a difficult question, and as Dr. Simons notes, “the answer isn’t etched in the sky or an echo from the past, but is ultimately found within ourselves.”

Dr. Doug Simons received his B.S. in astronomy at the California Institute of Technology in 1985 and aSimons_CFHT Ph.D. in astronomy at the University of Hawai‘i in 1990 before working as a staff astronomer at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope for 4 years. Doug joined Gemini Observatory in May of 1994 as the Systems Scientist, then managed Gemini’s instrument development program for 5 years before becoming Gemini’s Director from 2006-2011. Doug returned to CFHT in 2012 where he now serves as Executive Director. Principal areas of interest include infrared instrumentation and studies of the Galactic center, low mass stars, and star formation regions.

CFHT will provide their 2015 Hawaiian Starlight Wall Calendar for the first 50 in the planetarium line that night. The twelve gorgeous, true-color images obtained by the MegaCam wide-field CCD imaging camera illustrate brilliantly the rich and complex structures populating our Universe.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Jan 23 15

Darwin and His Fabulous Orchids Screening

by vrecinto

Gal_all_100

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center will have a special screening of the planetarium show Darwin and His Fabulous Orchids on Friday, January 30, 2015.  The screening is at 7 pm and is approximately 50 minutes in length.

Enjoy this fascinating journey into the secret life of orchids. In gigantic close-ups, the audience will learn the tricks used by the orchids to ensure their reproduction. Darwin once wrote that hardly anything else had fascinated him so much as orchids. In the immersive dome, sheet upon sheet of paper on which Darwin recorded his research will turn into a paper ocean, the expedition ship “The Beagle,” or the forest in which orchid hunters hoped to find everlasting fame. Experience a sensuous sea of flowers as well as the life and times of Charles Darwin.

Aesthetic, unique, impressive – this planetarium show will be an optically intense, but at the same time elegant experience. It is an introduction to the largest and most variedGal_all_041 family of plants as well as to the research carried out by Charles Darwin. Lose yourself in a sea of colors. Let yourself be carried away and intoxicated.

Orchids are amazingly seductive and full of tricks when it comes to attracting insects and ensuring pollination, which in turn means securing their own survival. Their creativity amazed Charles Darwin who carried out intensive research on this family of plants.

Although the show is in every detail biologically and historically authentic, the humorous side is not neglected. The atmosphere is in particular intensified by the visual atmosphere created by the designer Ralph Heinsohn and by a soundtrack which was composed and arranged exclusively for the show by the musician and sound designer Sven Lütgen.

It was produced at the Centre for Cultural and Scientific Communication at Kiel University of Applied Sciences in collaboration with the Botanical Garden of the Christian Albrecht University in Kiel and the motion pictures studio Tilt in Hamburg. Funded by the Volkswagen Foundation.

Ticket price is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

View Trailer

 

Jan 17 15

Voices Of the Wa’a speaker Keala Kahuanui Quartermaster and Cook.

by vrecinto

Waa talk jan 23 15 rs

‘Imiloa Presents Voices From The Wa’a

Food Preparation on the Sea

‘Imiloa’s Wayfinding Talk

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents the wayfinding talk Voices from the Wa‘a on Friday, January 23, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. This program will feature Keala Kahuanui, a watch captain, cook and assistantKeala-Kahuanui-150x150 quartermaster aboard Hōkūle‘a as she recounts her experiences of what it took to keep a crew happy and healthy for two months out at sea, even amidst a raging storm. ‘Imiloa’s wayfinding programs are made possible through the generous title sponsorship from Matson.

The mission of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage is to navigate our island Earth toward a healthy and sustainable future, and no one understands sustainability more than the person who plans, weighs, packs, prepares and cooks all the meals on the wa‘a.

Keala Kahuanui, a Hawaiian cultural resource teacher at the Hawaiian immersion charter school Kanu o ka ʻAina New Century Public Charter School, and a Kailua High alumni, was a crew member on the second leg of the Worldwide Voyage which left from Tahiti to the Cook Islands then to Samoa. She has been involved in the training, sailing and teaching aboard the Makali‘i, a double hulled Hawaiian voyaging canoe on Hawai‘i island, since 2000. She credits her strong voyaging foundation to some of the fathers of the Polynesian Voyaging Society Clay Bertelmann, Shorty Bertelmann, and Chadd Onohi Paishon. Her first voyage in 2007, Kū Holo Mau, to Micronesia to gift Papa Mau with a Hawaiian voyaging canoe named Alingano Maisu. She as well was mentored by her voyaging “sisters” like Patti Ann Solomon of Kohala, Kanani Kahalehoe of Hana and Pomai Bertelmann of Waimea.

The program ticketing is $10 for non-members and $8 for members (member level discounts apply.) Tickets may be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone, using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or JCB, by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9700.

Jan 16 15

Pre-Valentine Event with Kris Fuchigami

by vrecinto

Kris posterAccomplished ukulele artist, Kris Fuchigami returns to ‘Imiloa’s Planetarium stage on Friday, February 13, 2015. The pre-Valentine evening will begin with pupus in the Atrium at 5:30 p.m. followed by a concert under the Planetarium stars at 7:00 p.m. Fuchigami will be joined by special guest and award-winning artist, Brittni Paiva.

Pupu menu includes Kalua Pork in Steamed Buns, Korean Chicken, Sushi, Potstickers, Seasoned Edamame, Iced Tea, Coffee and more. Cash Bar for Beer & Wine
*Food and Drink not allowed in the Planetarium.

Born and raised on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, Kris Fuchigami began his musical journey at the age of 13, with an old beat up ukulele in his hands and a strong desire to master that tiny little instrument.

Two years later Kris won the grand prize at the Hamakua Music Scholarship Competition on the Big Island where he competed against classical pianists, singers, drummers, and many other genres of musicians. Kris went on to headline, and perform at many ukulele festivals and has gained recognition throughout the world.

Now, at the age of 24, Kris has released 3 CDs and has been privileged to perform with music greats such as Jake Shimabukuro, Mark Yamanaka, Daniel Ho, and Brittni Paiva.

Tickets for this event are $45 for non-members and $35 for members. Seats are limited and can be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

fuchigami 1

Dec 23 14

Botanical Drawing in Color with Wendy Hollender (Enrollment Closed)

by vrecinto

Ulu-Breadfruit-Artocarpus+altilis

Enrollment is Closed for this Program.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center hosts botanical artist, instructor, and author Wendy Hollender for a two-day workshop Thursday and Friday, March 5 – 6, 2015. Join Hollender as she teaches the techniques outlined in her book Botanical Drawing in Color: A Basic Guide to Mastering Realistic Form and Naturalistic Color (Random House). Students will learn how to use a grisaille technique with colored pencils where one starts with undertones in a neutral color and then layers color on top in order to produce a three-dimensional effect. This technique is very immediate and materials are simple, allowing the artist to work easily in multiple locations, especially out in the field.

Students will become familiar with the techniques and practice on simple forms such as fruits and then will work on more complex forms such as flowers. She will feature some of the endemic, indigenous and canoe plants on  ‘Imiloa’s grounds.
The workshop runs from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. daily with a lunch break. Supplies and lunch are not provided. See supply list.

Seats are limited, so reserve your space today. Beginners are welcome. Tuition for the workshop is $175 for members and $200 for non-members. Registration deadline is Thursday, February 5 and is subject to cancellation if a minimum of students is not met. Enrollment may be purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours.

Hollender’s illustrations have been published in The New York Times, Oprah’s O Magazine, Real Simple and The Observer. Her work was included in the 13th International Exhibition at Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, and in exhibitions at the Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew, and the Smithsonian National Museum for Natural History. She is the author of Botanical Drawing in Color: A Basic Guide to Mastering Realistic Form and Naturalistic Color and Botanical Drawing, A Beginner’s Guide. Her newest book is called Foraging & Feasting: A Field Guide and Wild Food Cookbook. You can visit her website at www.drawingincolor.com

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawaiʻi’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org.

Ohi'a'ai-Mountain+Apple-Syzygium+malaccense    Ape-Elephant+Ear-Alocasia+macrorrhiza

Dec 19 14

Decoding the Red Planet

by vrecinto
ht_opportunity_rover_nt_130124_wmain

An artist’s rendition of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is superimposed on the rim of Victoria Crater on the Martian surface. Cornell /JPL/NASA

 

This talk was rescheduled due to Hurricane Anna.

Next Maunakea Skies Talk January 16, 2015

Speaker: Dr. Bo Reipurth, Institute for Astronomy (IfA)

Topic: Mars, the Red Planet, in Culture and Science

Time: Friday January 16, 2015 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Mars is the planet in our Solar System that is closest in appearance to our Earth. It has a thin atmosphere with clouds, polar ice caps, volcanoes, major dry riverbeds, valleys, and deserts. Its axis is tilted, so it has seasons like here on Earth. These similarities to Earth have caused much speculation about life on Mars, originally inspired by the discovery of “canals” on Mars, erroneously believed to be signs of an advanced civilization that was attempting to survive as their planet dried out. These ideas have inspired many novels, movies, and radio programs, the most famous was Orson Welles 1938 broadcast “The War of the Worlds,” which caused widespread panic.

Modern studies of Mars have been helped by a large number of satellites put into orbit around the planet, as well as several rovers, some of which are at the moment driving around on the Martian surface, providing amazingly detailed photos of the landscapes of Mars.

“All these studies indicate that Mars was warmer and wetter in a distant past, likely with shallow oceans covering part of the surface. This has led to renewed discussion of the possibility that microbial life could have formed in the past and survived in subsurface layers,” states Dr. Reipurth.

Now, present and future space missions are charged with finding out if life still exists on Mars. Future studies will be discussed, including plans for sending men to Mars within a few decades. This talk will summarize the changing views of Mars from antiquity to the present day, and will be illustrated with many of the stunning images brought back from the missions to Mars.

As a small child, one of Bo Reipurth’s first astronomical experiences was looking at the craters of the Moon and the rings of Saturn through the telescope at a public observatory in his native Copenhagen. After that experience, he never doubted that he would become an astronomer.Bo_MK

Reipurth received his PhD from the University of Copenhagen in 1981. After several years there as a postdoctoral researcher, he worked as a staff astronomer with the European Southern Observatory in Chile for 11 years. He then spent four years at the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy(CASA) of the University of Colorado as a research professor. He joined the IfA in Honolulu in 2001 and moved to the Hilo office in 2004.

Reipurth is the coauthor (with frequent collaborator John Bally) of “The Birth of Stars and Planets.” Published in 2006 by Cambridge University Press, it contains many beautiful color pictures of sites of star birth and text that is very accessible to nonscientists. He is also a member of the UH NASA Astrobiology Institute Lead Team, a cross-disciplinary group that is studying the relationship of water in the Universe to the development of life.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.
The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Dec 19 14

FROZEN Sing-A-Long at ‘Imiloa (Sold Out)

by vrecinto

 frozen characters

This Event is Sold Out.

‘Imiloa presents: FROZEN Sing-A-Long

Sunday, January 11, 2015 at 10:00 am and 1:30 pm.

Love the songs of Disney’s Frozen? 

Join us as we sing along with Elsa, Anna, Olaf and friends.

All ages are welcome  and dress up as your favorite Disney character or Super Hero!

“For the first time in forever,” sing along to the words of the Academy Award-Nominated film event of a generation. Enjoy Disney’s Frozen Sing-A-Long, at a special sing along screening in ‘Imiloa’s Monanahoku Hall on Sunday, January 11, 2015.  There will be two showings available, 10 am and 1:30 pm, as well as Fun Frozen Science activities in the exhibit hall from 10 am to 4 pm for all participants.

Chances are you know the lyrics to “Let it Go” by heart. Join the whole FROZEN gang as you belt out “Do You Wanna Build a Snowman” and “For the First Time in Forever.”

After the kingdom of Arendelle is cast into eternal winter by the powerful Snow Queen Elsa (voice of Idina Menzel), her sprightly sister Anna (Kristen Bell) teams up with a rough-hewn mountaineer named Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) and his trusty reindeer Sven to break the icy spell. Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee co-directed this Walt Disney Animation Studios production based on Hans Christian Andersen’s beloved fairy tale The Snow Queen published circa 1845.

 Cost is $4 for Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703. Ticket includes one screening and entry to the Frozen Science Activities in the Exhibit Hall. Seating is limited.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Practice the “Let it Go” lyrics!

Dec 6 14

What is PANOPTES?

by vrecinto

panotopes

Next Maunakea Skies Talk December 19, 2014

Speakers: Dr. Olivier Guyon and Dr. Josh Walawender, Subaru Telescope-NAOJ

Topic: Observing Exoplanets with Small and Large Telescopes

Time: Friday, December 19, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Over the last 20 years, astronomers have discovered thousands of exoplanets. Thanks to recent technological advances, the pace of discovery is accelerating, and Earth-sized planets are now detectable around other stars. The prospects for life outside the solar system look excellent, with 10% to 40% of stars hosting potentially habitable Earth-sized planets with a surface temperature able to sustain liquid water. The search for exoplanets is done with a wide range of techniques, each making rapid progress. Very small telescopes can be used to find new planets by monitoring a large number of stars to search for planet transits.

Dr. Guyon and Dr. Walawender will present the Panoptic Astronomical Networked OPtical observatory for Transiting Exoplanets Survey project (PANOPTES), which is establishing a network of robotic wide field imaging units built and operated by citizen scientists. Each unit uses inexpensive digital cameras to find large planets. The full network can find smaller planets by combining many measurements. Once found, exoplanets can be observed with large professional telescopes for detailed study. Astronomers are developing cameras optimized for directly imaging exoplanets with large telescopes, which requires unconventional optics to remove the bright glare of the star around which a planet orbits. Thanks to these instruments, scientists will soon measure the composition of potentially habitable exoplanets’ atmospheres and surfaces, and search for evidence of biological activity.

Dr. Olivier Guyon is an astronomer at the Subaru Telescope-NAOJ. He started looking at stars from theguyon 14 age of 10, and he is now both an avid amateur astronomer and a professional astronomer. Olivier has been developing new techniques for imaging exoplanets (planets around other stars) from telescopes on Earth and also future telescopes in space. In 2007, Olivier received a Presidential Early Career for Scientists and Engineers award from President Bush at the White House. Olivier received in 2012, the MacArthur fellowship (nicknamed the “Genius grant”) for his innovative work in astronomical optics. In his spare time, he builds telescopes which he then uses to observe from the clear skies of Maunakea and Maunaloa.

walawenderDr. Josh Walawender is an astronomer at the Subaru Telescope-NAOJ on Maunakea. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of California at Berkeley and his PhD at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Josh’s research interests lie in the area of star formation and he has worked extensively on building and operating “small” (0.1 to 1 meter) robotic telescopes. Josh has been an avid amateur astronomer since childhood and still enjoys observing sessions under Hawai’i Island’s pristine skies.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Nov 21 14

Revisiting Bethlehem and the Christmas Star

by vrecinto

christmas_still1

‘Imiloa presents: The Skies Above Bethlehem & Mystery of the Christmas Star

Friday, December 12, 2014 at 7:00pm

We all know the Christian tale of the three wise men that followed the star of Bethlehem to the manger of the baby Jesus bearing gifts for the son of God. Although they followed the Christmas star, their skies would have been like today, filled with stars and other celestial objects.

Join the ‘Imiloa planetarium staff on a journey to the far side of the world as we turn back the clock two thousand years to look at the sky over Bethlehem. Once beneath the biblical sky, we will explore the heavens that were visible to the residents of Bethlehem the night Jesus was born. Skies Above Bethlehem is a seasonal remix of our classic Skies Above Hawai’i night sky program. Of course, this begs the question: how do we know what date to turn our clocks back to?christmas_postercrop

After the live presentation enjoy the planetarium show Mystery of the Christmas Star and discover a possible scientific explanation and time frame for the star the wise men followed to find the baby Jesus. This program investigates recorded sightings of significant astronomical events during the time of the birth of Christ. Investigators will see which of these signs in the sky could have been remarkable enough to cause the wise men to travel across the desert from Babylon just to see a newborn King.

Don’t miss this special holiday presentation, one night only, December 12th, 2014 at 7:00pm.

The program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff.  Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a world-class informal science education center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration and hope for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, and programs and events engage children, families, visitors and the local community in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information, visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org. ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org.

Oct 30 14

Hello Universe

by vrecinto

TMT pic

Next Maunakea Skies Talk November 21, 2014

Speaker: Dr. Gordon K. Squires, TMT Communications and Outreach Lead

 Topic: Hello Universe – What Else Do You Have?

Time: Friday November 21, 2014 at 7 p.m. in the ‘Imiloa Planetarium

Recent discoveries with current-generation observatories on Maunakea and in space will be highlighted with a sneak-peak of how the next-generation Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will advance our understanding of the universe even further. TMT has entered the construction phase in Hawai’i and across the TMT international partnership, with science operations scheduled to begin in the early 2020s. In this talk Dr. Squires will provide an update on the current status of TMT, discuss recent advances in Hawai’i and around the world in the construction of TMT, highlight the special nature of the unique partnership between the US, Canada, India, Japan and China, and the special location of Maunakea as a nexus for exploring our universe.

Gordon K. Squires is an astronomer at the California Institute of Technology, working with the Thirty Meter Telescope, as wellGordon Squires as NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, the Herschel Space Observatory, the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, NuSTAR, Kepler, WISE, and other space telescopes with Caltech involvement. His research explores the old, cold and distant universe – understanding how galaxies formed billions of years ago, the nature of the dark matter, and dark energy that fills space.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.
The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.