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Jul 31 15

Special Talk: Star Lore in the Japanese Sky

by Anna Liu

Summer Solstice at Tamagusukuk Castle

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center is pleased to present a special talk on “Stars in the Land of the Rising Sun” in the Planetarium on Friday evening, August 14, at 7 pm. Dr. Akira Goto, Professor of Anthropology at Nanzan University, will explore Japanese star lore as a complex mixture of animism, Buddhism, Shinto-ism, Confucianism and folk beliefs.

Topics to be covered are: (1) the practical use of star lore by Japanese farmers and fishermen, who used the movement of the sun, moon and stars for weather forecasting, season reckoning and other practical purposes, including navigation; (2) folk customs and rituals surrounding stars, including tragic love stories such as that commemorated in the “tanabata” festival; and (3) legends of fallen stars and historical interpretations. Japanese star lore will be explored in context with examples drawn from the Ainu in Hokkaido in the North and the sub-tropical Ryukyu Islands in the South.

Professor Akira Goto is Director of the Anthropological Institute at Nanzan University in Nagoya, Japan. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa and helped to develop content for the Oceanic Culture Museum & Planetarium in Okinawa. He has written widely on ethnoarchaeology and the intersection between astronomy and anthropology, and he serves as Vice President of the newly established Nippon Voyaging Association.

Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org or call (808) 969-9703.

 

Jul 31 15

Exploring Small Worlds

by Anna Liu
Pluto's South Pole by NASA

Pluto’s South Pole, photo courtesy of NASA

Next Maunakea Skies Talk August 21, 2015

Speaker: Dr. Alan Tokunaga, NASA Infrared Telescope Facility

Topic: Exploring Small Worlds

Join Dr. Alan Tokunaga, Director of the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), for ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center’s next “Maunakea Skies Talk” August 21, 2015 at 7 pm.

The recent discoveries on dwarf planets Pluto, Ceres, Vesta, and the Comet Churyumov–Gerasimenko made by spacecraft have expanded our understanding of these amazing worlds in our Solar System. These places are also observed by the telescopes on Maunakea. Dr. Tokunaga will discuss how the IRTF contributes to observing these distant regions.

DR. T

Dr. Alan Tokunaga

Dr. Tokunaga is the Director for the NASA IRTF, a 3.0-meter telescope on Maunakea. He grew up on Maui and got his training in astronomy at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research specialty is building infrared instruments and infrared observations of solar system objects, young stars, and the interstellar medium. He is presently leading an effort to build an infrared spectrograph for the IRTF. The IRTF is funded by NASA to make observations that are needed to support planetary missions. The telescope is operated by the University of Hawai‘i through a contract with NASA.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Emily Peavy, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff who will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org or call (808) 969-9703.

Jul 29 15

Aloha Art Festival

by vrecinto

AlohaArtFestFlyer (1)

 

‘Imiloa to Host Expressions of Maunakea Through Art

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i will host The Aloha Art Festival on Sunday, August 2, 2015 from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm. There will be art creation stations, keiki activities, star talks, educational booths, and guest speakers. The festival includes an art contest in search of a piece to represent culture, natural environment, and innovation on Maunakea. Art contest winners will be displayed at the Visitor Information Station at Halepohaku on Maunakea and at ‘Imiloa.

Admission to ‘Imiloa’s exhibit hall and planetarium will be free of charge with submission of one art piece per person on that day. All contest art must be submitted at ‘Imiloa on Sunday, August 2, either completed or prepared on-site. Art creation stations will be available for participants of all ages at ‘Imiloa, including supplies for painting, coloring, textiles, etc.

‘Imiloa’s exhibit hall will feature interactive displays and special exhibits for all ages. Additional activities will be outdoors. Guest speakers will be presenting in the Earl and Doris Bakken Moanahōkū Hall, including Luana Busby-Neff on Kapu Aloha, Michael Kumukauoha Lee on Traditional Hawaiian Astronomy, Larry Kimura on Maunakea’s esteemed summit, and Mark Chun on his experience as an astronomer on Maunakea. Special programs will also be part of the planetarium schedule.

Visit www.facebook.com/AlohaArtFestival for more details and program updates.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is a cultural science center located on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus. ‘Imiloa is a place of life-long learning where the power of Hawai‘i’s cultural traditions, its legacy of exploration and the wonders of astronomy come together to provide inspiration for generations. The Center’s interactive exhibits, 3D full dome planetarium, native landscape, programs and events engage families, and visitors in the wonders of science and technology found in Hawai‘i. It is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday (closed Mondays). For more information visit the website at www.imiloahawaii.org

Jul 16 15

A Talk About Keck

by vrecinto
Keck primary Mirror, Photo by Andrew Cooper

Keck Primary Mirror, Photo by Andrew Cooper

Next Maunakea Skies Talk July 17, 2015

Speaker: Andrew Cooper, Keck Observatory

Topic: Keck Telescope

Join Keck Observatory electrical engineer, Andrew Cooper for his “Mauankea Skies Talk” July 17, 2015 at 7pm.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Emily Peavy, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff who will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Jul 16 15

Wayfinding Talk: Filming on Hōkūle‘a

by Anna Liu

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents the wayfinding talk Voices from the Wa‘a: Documenting the Worldwide Voyage from the Deck of Hōkūle‘a, featuring Keoni Lee, Co-Founder of ‘Ōiwi TV on Friday, July 24, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. This program will feature the challenges of capturing a public record of the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s historic 3-year journey to circumnavigate the globe on the traditional Hawaiian sailing canoe, Hōkūle‘a.

Lee and the ‘Ōiwi TV team are serving as the official documentors of the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Lee’s upcoming wayinding talk will take the audience behind-the-scenes on the Worldwide Keoni Headshot cropVoyage and discuss the opportunities and challenges of storytelling from the deck of a voyaging canoe. In this age of social media, learn how he and the crew of young Hawaiian storytellers at ‘Ōiwi TV are documenting this epic journey for the people of Hawai‘i and engaging a new global audience with Hōkūle‘a and Mālama.

“It is challenging to embed a documentation team on a traditional voyaging canoe, getting real time coverage, and access to the technologies needed. But the amazing places and people we meet and sharing the Hawaiian values of Mālama Honua with the world are incredible rewards,” notes Lee.

Lee is the key strategist for the media, communication and IT for the voyage, which so far has taken him on 7 international trips totaling 16 weeks away from Hawai‘i. He has just returned from Australia, where he has spent time on Hōkūle‘a.

Keoni Lee is a co-founder of ‘Ōiwi TV, the first native Hawaiian owned and operated television station. Founded in 2009, ‘Ōiwi TV is a “social enterprise media company” that produces top-quality documentaries, news and multimedia content from a uniquely Hawaiian perspective. As general manager, he oversees the day-to-day operations of ‘Ōiwi TV and focuses his “techie” skill set on developing content and engagement strategies that leverage technology to create a new model for community-based media in the digital age.

The program ticketing is $10 for non-members and $8 for members (member level discounts apply.) Tickets may be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone, using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or JCB, by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9700.

‘Imiloa’s 2014-2015 wayfinding programs are made possible

through generous title sponsorship from Matson.

Matson Anchor T  - Blue (2)

Jun 25 15

Epic Origami

by vrecinto

ANIMAlSImiloa Astronomy Center will feature local Waimea artist Bonnie Cherni and other guest artists in a new EPIC ORIGAMI exhibit. The three-month exhibit will explore the art and science of origami from July 5, 2015 – September 27, 2015. Cherni’s art has been shown at Kahilu Theatre,

Photo of Bonnie Cherni

Photo of Bonnie Cherni

Keck Observatory, and Waimea Ocean Film Festival and will be presented at ‘Imiloa with some never-seen-before pieces including the Jackson lizard, an endangered Hawaiian hoary bat, rhinos, the wild pig and a smiley frog. This exhibit will also explore how the application of math to art has made advances in astronomy, medicine and the automotive industry. In conjunction with this exhibit, the award-winning film “Between the Folds” will be shown daily in the planetarium at 11:00 a.m. (not full dome, but letterbox format). This documentary paints a striking portrait of the remarkable artistic and scientific creativity that fuels the ever-changing art of origami, fusing science and sculpture, form and function, and ancient and new. A hands-on origami folding station and exciting origami scavenger hunt will also be a part of this exhibit.

The exhibit will officially open on Sunday, July 5 at 9:00 a.m. with two showings of “Between the Folds” at 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. and origami folding stations available throughout the day. From 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. ‘Imiloa members are invited to a private pizza lunch and exclusive origami folding activities with artist Bonnie Cherni.Lizard

Cherni is an avid student of John Montroll’s designs and was inspired to fold origami from the age of fifteen. She is the leading artist for this exhibit and has collaborated with guest artists from around the world, creating everything from miniature to life-sized sculptures, in mediums ranging from paper, Fireworksaluminum, copper and canvas. Her art embodies the idea of “folding sturdy sculptures that can live out in the real world.” Other artists represented include: (1) Vietnamese artist Nguyen Hung Cuong lives in Hanoi and folds many of his expressive designs using a Vietnamese paper with a waxy finish called Dó. He has been folding since the young age of five and has been featured in many origami books with his incredibly detailed pieces. (2) Nicolas Terry is a professional origami artist who resides in Paris, France. He is an accomplished author and creator of one of the most popular origami sites in the world (origami-shop.us). (3) Steven Epstein resides on the Big Island.  With a degree in computer science and minor in math, Epstein has fun bringing math to life with his intricate modular origami pieces. (4) Local artist Shannon Nakaya is a highly recognized bird surgeon and veterinarian who applies her understanding of anatomical structure and function to folding complex origami.

Admission to EPIC ORIGAMI and “Between the Folds” is included in the general admission fee of $17.50 for adults and $9.50 for children. Kama’aina prices are available and, as always, ‘Imiloa Giraffemembers receive free admission.

ORIGAMI WORKSHOPS

Cherni will be back at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center to teach special workshops on July 11 and September 19 from 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.  Beginner to advanced origami folders are welcome and can explore the many possibilities of this fun and addicting art! Admission is $25.00 for members and $35.00 for non-members. Space is very limited so early registration is suggested.  An adult must accompany children under ten.  To sign-up, visit ‘Imiloa’s front desk or call (808) 969-9703.

tribune ad origami redo

May 29 15

Antarctica Astronomy

by vrecinto
 Amundsen-Scott Station

The South Pole Telescope at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station

 

Next Maunakea Skies Talk June 19, 2015

Speaker: Professor Walter Gear, East Asian Observatory

Topic: Astronomy in Antarctica

Antarctica is the coldest, driest, windiest continent on earth. While inhospitable for humans and most animals, it is an excellent site for astronomy, indeed the best in the world for some types of observations.

Professor Gear will review the geography and properties of Antarctica before describing his own experiences in reaching and spending time at the South Pole, and explaining some of the world-leading astronomical results that have been obtained there.

Dr. Walter Gear is a professor at Cardiff University, Wales, UK and is currently spending time at the Eastwalter gear Asian Observatory in Hilo, which has taken over operations of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) from the UK. Professor Gear has been coming to the Island of Hawai’i for over 30 years to make use of the outstanding skies on Maunakea, including living in Hilo for two years in the 1990s when he led commissioning and operation of the SCUBA camera on the JCMT. Gear’s research is largely concerned with astronomical instrumentation, the Cosmic Microwave Background and Star-formation in Galaxies.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by an ‘Imiloa planetarium staff who will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

AURORAMAPO

May 12 15

Hilo Lahaina Noon 2015

by vrecinto

lahaina noon 072

It is that time of year when the Hawaiian Islands experience the astronomical phenomenon known as “Lahaina Noon.” That is  when the sun reaches its zenith and makes shadows virtually disappear for vertical objects set at a 90 degree angle. Hawai‘i is the only state in the nation with this phenomenon, because it only happens in the tropics (between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn). It occurs twice a year at every location in the islands.

During  Lahaina Noon at ‘Imiloa in Hilo, our 14 foot mosaic “Voyage of the Navigator” will be illuminated when the sun will be directly over the sky light, thus creating a great example of Lahaina Noon.  Let’s just hope we have a sunny Hilo day. Unfortunately we are closed Mondays.

2015 Lahaina Noon days and times

Hilo

May 18 12:17 p.m.

July 24 12:26 p.m.

Kailua-Kona

May 18 12:20 p.m.

July 24 12:30 p.m.

Līhue 

May 31 12:35 p.m.

July 11 12:42 p.m.

Kāne‘ohe

May 27 12:28 p.m.

July 15 12:37 p.m.

Honolulu

May 26 12:28 p.m.

July 16 12:37 p.m.

Kaunakakai

May 25 12:25 p.m.

July 16 12:34 p.m.

Lāna‘i City

May 24 12:24 p.m.

July 18 12:34 p.m.

Lahaina

May 24 12:23 p.m.

July 18 12:33 p.m.

Kahului

May 24 12:22 p.m.

July 18 12:32 p.m.

Hāna

May 23 12:20 p.m.

July 18 12:30 p.m.

South Point Island of Hawai‘i

May 15 12:19 p.m.

July 28 12:28 p.m.

 

 

May 9 15

Recent Discoveries and Future Promise from UKIRT

by vrecinto

ukirt_fisheye

Next Maunakea Skies Talk May 15, 2015 at 7PM

Speaker: Dr. Richard Green, UKIRT

Topic: UKIRT: Recent Discoveries and Future Promise + The International Year of Light

The United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) was conceived and realized by astronomers in the UK to be particularly sensitive to infrared radiation. After major refurbishment in the 1990s and the addition of a unique panoramic camera ten years ago, the facility has surveyed the infrared sky to power an outpouring of ukirt-jan31-webscientific discovery. Studies of the distant Universe where all objects are highly redshifted benefit from UKIRT’s ability to detect and measure faint, red objects. Similarly, in the nearby Universe, newly formed stars are shrouded in reddening dust and very small stars shine dimly red. Both are visible to UKIRT.

Dr. Green will discuss the latest results on the most distant quasars, how galaxies evolve over cosmic time, and the ways that clouds of cold gas fragment and condense into clusters of newly formed stars. Since last November, UKIRT has been under new management. Not only will it continue to observe the most distant galaxies and quasars along with nearby stellar nurseries, it will also be used to characterize objects right next door, such as orbital space debris and asteroids coming very near the Earth.

The United Nations declared 2015 as the International Year of Light. Astronomers are actively participating to emphasize two aspects of light: Cosmic Light, which provides our key to the Universe beyond our planet, and Quality Light, the control of our nighttime lighting to save energy, preserve the biosphere, and protect the observatories that provide our gateway to the heavens from blinding glare.

Dr. Richard Green is the Assistant Director for Government Relations of Steward Observatory at the DrUniversity of Arizona. He graduated from Harvard College in 1971 and then went to graduate school in astronomy at CalTech. In 1983 he became a staff astronomer at Kitt Peak, and in 1992 he moved into management of the National Observatories. He was Director of Kitt Peak National Observatory from 1997 to 2005, and then was appointed the Director of the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory at the University of Arizona until 2013. Dr. Green  is now serving as Director of UKIRT Observatory here on the Island of Hawai’i. Green’s major research interests are in quasars and the early Universe, the cosmic history of chemical element abundances, dynamics of the nuclei of galaxies, and the end stages of stellar evolution.

Maunakea Skies program will be hosted by Cam Wipper, ‘Imiloa planetarium staff. He will provide observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, pointing out prominent constellations and stars one can see during this time of year.

The monthly Maunakea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. Cost is $8 for Individual, Dual, Kupuna and Family Members; $6 for Patron Members; Free for Silver, Gold, and Corporate Members. Non-member rate is $10. Pre-purchase tickets at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone at 969-9703.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9703.

Apr 14 15

Reflections on the First 20 Years of Hōkūleʻa

by vrecinto

IMG_3403 (1)

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center presents the wayfinding talk Voices from the Wa‘a: Reflections on the First 20 Years of the Hōkūle‘a on Friday, April 24, 2015 at 7:00 p.m. This program will feature Gordon Pi‘ianāi‘a, the captain of Hōkūle‘a on its pivotal 1980 voyage, during which he and Nainoa Thompson and others became the first Hawaiians in some 600 years to locate Tahiti without using modern navigational tools.

Enjoy this night of storytelling from a veteran Hōkūle‘a crew member, as Pi‘ianāi‘a recounts the first twenty years of the Polynesian voyaging renaissance.

Pi‘ianāi‘a spent 20 years sailing and voyaging on the Hōkūle‘a, serving as first mate on her 1976 voyage from Tahiti to Hawai‘i and also as Captain on the 1980 and 1985 voyages. Pi‘ianāi‘a was one of the early pioneering leaders in the formative years of the Polynesian Voyaging Society, serving both as co-chair of the Education Committee and also as a board member. Today he continues to work to perpetuate and revitalize the art of wayfinding and navigation through his involvement with the ‘Ohana Wa‘a, a consortium of Hawai‘i’s voyaging organizations, canoe leadership and crews.

Captain Gordon Keawe-a-Heulu Keli‘imaika‘i Pi‘ianāi‘a is a retired U.S. Naval Reserve Officer, educator and community leader. He was born in Honolulu to a family noted for its mariners and geographers. His father Abraham was a master mariner who introduced him to the sea when he was five by taking him sailing on inter-island ships. His brother Norman, a graduate of the United States Merchant Marine Academy, retired from a career as a senior ship’s master at Matson Navigation.

The Pi‘ianāi‘a family have all participated in Hōkūle‘a’s voyages. A graduate of the Kamehameha School for Boys, Gordon received his Bachelors of Science in Nautical Science from the California Maritime Academy, and later conducted graduate studies in Geography at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa, joining his father Abraham and sister ‘Ilima in the Department of Geography.

‘Imiloa’s wayfinding programs are made possible through generous title sponsorship from Matson.

The program ticketing is $10 for non-members and $8 for members (member level discounts apply.) Tickets may be pre-purchased at the ‘Imiloa front desk or by phone, using Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or JCB, by calling (808) 969-9703 during regular business hours. Tickets are non-refundable.

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawai‘i is located at 600 ‘Imiloa Place in Hilo, off Komohana and Nowelo Streets at the UH-Hilo Science and Technology Park. For more information, go to www.imiloahawaii.org, or call (808) 969-9700.

 

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